WOD

On The Bench Week 9: 6/26/2017

Week 9 On The Bench and things are getting turned up!  65% of your 1 Rep Max plus 40#. A few weeks ago, we posted the following video in regards to deadlifts.  However, it holds true also to squatting and bench press.  If you missed it, take a look.  Very interesting to think about while executing these lifts….

Start thinking of your lifts as multi-directional movements or multi-directional efforts. While squatting, drive your feet into the floor as well as drive your upper back into the barbell.  In the bench press, press the barbell away from you as well as pressing yourself away from the barbell. In the deadlift, move the barbell away from the floor and moving as well as moving the floor away from the barbell.  What’s this mean? Take a look!

Time to S-Q-U-A-T: 6/23/2017

Last Friday we did Back Squats  pausing on the Box(Ball)….  this Friday we will do the same drills with Front Squats. Quick mobility drills for the front rack is below, as well as a video on box squats in case you missed it last week!

Quick Front Rack Mobility Drills

How do you do a box squat?  Box Squats are performed just like regular squats with a few minor changes.  Stance is a bit wider than normal squat position, push your knees out, squat back, not down, until you completely sit on the box.  Your shins are become a bit more vertical than that of a regular squat. Every muscle is kept tight while on the box with the exception of the hip flexors.  By releasing and then contracting the hip flexors and arching the upper back, you will jump off the box, building tremendous starting strength.  Remember to sit back and down, not straight down.  Your hamstrings will be strengthened to a high degree, which is essential.  Remember to sit on the box completely and flex off of it.  This type of squatting is hard work, but each rep shouldn’t be hard.

Un-Glue Those Sticks: 6/22/2017

Over the course of a run, or simply a busy workday, our legs are used to offset several thousand pounds in force. Can you imagine how much weight your legs endure over a week? A year?! In this third video of the Ready to Run progression series, Starrett demonstrates a few exercises you can perform on your legs using lacrosse balls to help relax the soft tissue in your legs. Try these drills after a tiresome day or pre/post run and view the results for yourself.

Watch the full series!
VIDEO 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gyh5Z…
VIDEO 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOJPK…
VIDEO 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4t9O…
VIDEO 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWv5B…
VIDEO 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvZnj…

Floating the Kettlebell: 6/21/2017

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Learning proper Kettlebell technique means understanding how the KB floats up through a powerful hip drive and back down with minimal effort as your body counterbalances the weight. Take a look as our favorite (or most awkward) kettlebell guy, Jeff Martone, shows us how it’s done.  As Jeff explains, nailing proper technique means thinking of the American kettlebell swing as your active rest in a WOD.  Sounds pretty good right???

The Vertical Elbow: 6/19/17

Good position in the push-up is just as important as good positioning in the squat. Loading correctly, elbow position and keeping a tight butt and thighs throughout the movement prevents shoulder pain and increases power output.  First take a look as Dan Bailey and Rich Froning demonstrate the importance of a vertical elbow, then read on to tackle even more common push-up errors.

Common Mistake #1 – Arm Angle

In order to maximize your ability to create force and get better leverage on each rep, keep your elbows closer to your body instead of flaring them out at a 90-degree angle, which is typical for how most people do push ups.

nick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demosnick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demos

Left: wrong; Right: correct.

Common Mistake #2 – Elbow Positioning

When done well, the push up strengthens the entire upper body pushing musculature, including the chest, shoulders, and triceps. However, many people allow their elbows to move past their wrists, either behind or out to the side of the wrists. This not only places unwanted stress through the elbow joint (which elevates risk of an overuse injury at the elbows), it also makes the push up less effective because it reduces the chest and shoulder involvement, and makes it more of a triceps-dominant movement.

 

nick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demosnick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demos

Left: wrong; Right: correct.

The Quick Fix: Keep your elbows above your wrists through the entire push up action. Your elbows should form a 90-degree angle at the bottom position of the push up.

Common Mistake #3 – Hand Positioning

If your hands are pointed slightly inward, as is often the case in how many people perform push ups, it usually encourages people to flare their arms out away from their sides, which is the issue we covered in mistake number one. Not to mention, pointing your hands inward also forces for your elbows to move out beyond your wrists in the manner I just addressed in mistake number two. In short, better hand placement encourages better elbow alignment and shoulder positioning.

 

nick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demosnick tumminello, push ups, push up tips, push up videos, push up demos

Squat On The Box: 6/16/2017

How do you do a box squat?  Box Squats are performed just like regular squats with a few minor changes.  Stance is a bit wider than normal squat position, push your knees out, squat back, not down, until you completely sit on the box.  Your shins are become a bit more vertical than that of a regular squat. Every muscle is kept tight while on the box with the exception of the hip flexors.  By releasing and then contracting the hip flexors and arching the upper back, you will jump off the box, building tremendous starting strength.  Remember to sit back and down, not straight down.  Your hamstrings will be strengthened to a high degree, which is essential.  Remember to sit on the box completely and flex off of it.  This type of squatting is hard work, but each rep shouldn’t be hard.

 

What Limits Your Chest to Bar Pull-Ups? 6/14/2017

Screen Shot 2017-06-11 at 9.52.27 PM

Courtesy of CrossFit Invictus

“What does thoracic mobility have to do with pull-ups?” Almost everything, when you’re talking chest-to-bar…

Picture your typical office dweller – slumped over a computer, slouching with a hunched upper back and rounded shoulders – glued in a crappy position for hours on end. Now take that person -with their turtle shell back – and ask them to touch their concave chest to the bar at the top of a pull-up. They try and try, managing chin over bar pull-ups with ease but are unable to extend their thoracic spine to stick their chest out enough to make contact. Make sense?

Besides making chest-to-bar pull-ups nearly impossible, crappy shoulder and thoracic mobility mean that you can’t go overhead without straining or loading your lumbar and/or internally rotating your shoulders.

 The bottom of a pull up IS the overhead position and you can tell if you’re “that guy” if you are always getting reminded by your coaches to fully extend your elbows at the bottom of your pull-up.

But how many people do you know who spend an equal amount of time counteracting that crappy position? Very Few!

Instantly Lift More Weight: 6/13/17

Start thinking of your lifts as multi-directional movements or multi-directional efforts. While squatting, drive your feet into the floor as well as drive your upper back into the barbell.  In the bench press, press the barbell away from you as well as pressing yourself away from the barbell. In the deadlift, move the barbell away from the floor and moving as well as moving the floor away from the barbell.  What’s this mean? Take a look!

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